Scotland

Fortified sites

The Broch of Mousa, Shetland

The finest surviving broch structure, standing over 13m high. Owned by Scottish Heritage. Located on the island of Mousa, accessible by ferry boat from Sandwick, 14 miles south of Lerwick, Shetland. See the Historic Scotland website (www.historic-scotland.gov.uk) for ferry information and opening times. Alternatively call the Historic Scotland office in Skara Brae, Orkney for up-to-date information: (01856) 841815. Clickhimin Broch, Shetland

Broch tower and associated settlement and outer defences. Owned by Scottish Heritage. Located one mile south-west of Lerwick, Shetland. See the Visit Shetland website (www.visitshetland.com) for opening times and contact information.

Scottish Broch Tower

Hambledon Hill, Dorset was built in two phases on a narrow, winding ridge, the oldest portion of the site being on the northern end of the ridge - to the right of this view. In its final form the hill-fort enclosed an area of approximately 10 hectares. (RCAHM)

Belgae Fortifications
The impressive Iron Age hill-fort atYarnbury in Wiltshire was built around an earlier fort during the 1st century BC, and has been associated with the Belgae. The distinctive ravelin in front of the gateway probably acted as a miniature fort in its own right. (RCAHM)

The Broch of Gurness, Orkney

A superbly situated Iron Age broch and fortified village. The site also contains a small museum. Owned by Scottish Heritage. Located 15 miles north-west of Kirkwall, Orkney. Open in the summer season only (1 April to 30 September) For further information call (01856) 751414 or visit the Historic Scotland website listed above.

The Broch of Midhowe, Orkney

A well-preserved seashore broch and settlement. Owned by Scottish Heritage. Located on the island of Rousay. Accessible by ferry from Tingwall, on the Orkney mainland. Call (01856) 751360 for ferry details, and (01856) 841815 for access information and opening times, or visit the Historic Scotland website listed above. Dun Carloway Broch, Lewis

A broch perched above Loch Roag on the western coast of Lewis. Owned by the Doune Broch Centre. Open in the summer season only (1 April to 30 September). Visitor centre and museum adjacent to the site. For further information call (01851) 643338, or see www.undiscoveredscotland.co.uk/lewis/duncarloway/index.html and www.themodernantiquarian.com/site/791. Dun Telve, Glenelg

One of two broch towers in Glenelg on the Scottish mainland near Skye, both standing over 10m high. Owned by Scottish Heritage. For visitor information call (01667) 460232. Traprain Law, East Lothian

An impressive hill-fort, dominating the East Lothian coastal plain. Private ownership but public access permitted. Consult the following websites for detailed information on access to the site: www.cyberscotia.com/ancient-lothian/index.html and www.themodeniantiqiiarian.com/site/607. White Caterthun and Brown Caterthun, Angus

Located near Brechin, Angus within sight of each other, the hill-forts of White Caterthun and Brown Caterthun are in private hands, but accessible to the public. See the following websites for further information: www.themodernantiquarian.com/site/3031,www.stonepages.com/scotland/ bwcaterthun.html and www.iindiscoveredscotland.co.uk/bridgend/caterthuns. Eildon Hill North, Scottish Borders

Located near Melrose in the Scottish Borders. In private hands but accessible to the public. See the following website for more information: www.discovertheborders.co.uk/places/202.html. Woden Law, Scottish Borders

Located near Hownam in the Scottish Borders. In private hands but accessible to the public. See the following website for more information: www.megalithic.co.uk/article.plip?sid=10649. Burnswark, Dumfries & Galloway

An Iron Age hill-fort that was used by the Romans as a military training ground. In private hands but accessible to the public. See the following websites for more information: www.roman-britain.org/places/burnswark.litin and www.themodernantiquarian.com/site/6412.

Museums

The Orkney Museum, Tankerness House, Kirkwall, Orkney

An excellent collection of Iron Age artefacts, as well as a detailed introduction to prehistoric Orkney. For details call (01856) 773191, or visit the museum website: www.orkneyheritage.com.

Shetland Museum, Lower Hillhead, Lerwick, Shetland

A fascinating collection of archaeological artefacts relating to Shetland's Iron Age past. For details call (01595) 695057, or visit the museum website: www.shetland-musewn.org.uk/index.htm.

National Museum of Scotland, Chamber Street, Edinburgh

Scotland's premier history museum, it contains numerous Iron Age artefacts, including objects and hoards recovered from Traprain Law and other fortified sites. Open daily from 10am to 5pm. For further information visit the museum website: www.nms.ac.uk/scotland/home/index.asp. Oakbank Crannog, Kenmore, Loch Fay, Perthshire

A reconstruction of an Iron Age loch dwelling (or 'crannog'), the structure is based on the archaeological investigation of the original crannog located on the opposite bank of Loch Tay. The Oakbank Crannog Centre site includes an exhibition that helps interpret the Iron Age landscape of the area, integrating crannogs with the hinterland, and even the ring forts guarding the area. The author participated in the underwater excavation of the original structure back in the mid-1980s. The Oakbank Crannog Centre is open from 15 March to 31 October. Call (01887) 830583 for further information, or visit their website: http://www.crannog.co.uk/index.litml.

Hod Hill in Dorset is unique in that the Romans built an auxiliary fort in the north-west quadrant of the Iron Age fortification.The hill-fort was first built around 400 BC. but was modified extensively until the Roman invasion.The presence of iron bolts from Roman siege engines confirms Roman reports that the hill-fort was stormed and captured by the II Legion in AD 43. (RCAHM)

0 0

Post a comment