Essays On Coin Inscriptions

Very considerable advantage has been obtained in these inquiries, in combining the Celtic inscriptions of the moneys of Gaul with those of Britain, the latter not being intelligible except by means of the former. The references to the Celtic, in explaining the inscriptions noticed in these pages, have been made through the various dialects of that language, as the Armorican, Gaelic, ancient British or Welsh, and the Gaelic of Scotland, or Erse but the Manx dialect has not been used. The Welsh...

Chapter I

Gaulish, british, and pannonian coinages. The readers of these observations may be apprized that they will find a mention of ancient Britain in the following pages, which may be perhaps new to many of them. It may be so but it is only according to the true ancient history of the country, as I have elsewhere shown. The truth must be told. The real ancient history of early Britain is still, even now in the nineteenth century, very much behind hand. What is the fact Why that, since the time of...

Celtic Inscriptions On Gaulish And British Coins

Gaulish, British, and Pannonian coinages . . 1-4 The Gaulish coinage . . . . . ,5-14 The Gaulish coinage continued . . 15-23 The ancient British coinage General style of the inscriptions of Cunobeline, and of those of the Iceni and of the Southern Belgse, and a series of each given . . 24-46 Ancient British coins as objects of art and regarding the fabrication of various counterfeit types in the last century, and in the present one 47-59 The inscription on Cunpbeline's coins. of tascio fibbolg...